10 Things You Didn’t Know About The Legend Of The Neverbeast Creative Process

An Inside Look: 10 Things You Never Knew About the Creation of the NeverBeast

While visiting Los Angeles a few weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to have an inside look at the creative process behind the creation of the NeverBeast in Disney’s “Tinkerbell & the Legend of the NeverBeast”. This opportunity was not only eye-opening but also allowed me to interview the story artist and animation supervisor, Ryan Green and Mike Greenholt.

The Art of Animation

Being someone who has always been interested in drawing and animation, this was a dream come true. Witnessing the process that goes into making a film like this was fascinating. The fact that it involved one of my favourite characters, Tinkerbell, was just the icing on the cake!

1) The Evolution of Gruff

The character of the NeverBeast, Gruff, wasn’t a straightforward creation. The animators went through about 70 variations of him before they were satisfied with his final form.

2) The Name ‘Gruff’

Interestingly, the name ‘Gruff’ was never intended to be permanent. It was a temporary name given by the director during early stages of development. However, it stuck and eventually became the character’s official name.

3) The Anatomy of Gruff

Ryan Green, the story artist, put his degree in biology to good use. The team essentially started from the inside out, building Gruff’s skeleton, muscles, and fur to create a believable creature.

4) Finding Inspiration in the Animal Kingdom

To gain inspiration for Gruff’s design, the team visited the LA Zoo. They studied various animals such as rhinos, elephants, and hippos. Since Gruff is a fusion of several creatures, they needed different parts of his anatomy to mimic these animals. For instance, his legs are wide and hippo-like, and his tail resembles that of an opossum.

5) Striving for Realistic Movement

Despite Gruff being a fantasy creature, the team wanted him to move realistically. To achieve this, they got down on all fours to understand how the movement should look.

6) Studying Facial Movements and Mannerisms

Mike Greenholt’s dog served as an excellent reference for studying facial movements and mannerisms, further adding to Gruff’s realistic depiction.

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7) The Role of Voice Acting in Animation

The voice acting for the characters is recorded before the animation process. This allows the animators to reference the actors’ performances during the animation process, ensuring the characters’ movements match their voices.

8) The Lengthy Production Process

The movie took 3 1/2 years and a team of 40 animators to complete. The production process involved overlapping stages, with the design phase bleeding into the story process, and the story process bleeding into animation.

9) The Emotional Toll of Animation

Since the end of the movie is highly emotional, the animators working on these scenes often found themselves emotionally taxed. To alleviate this, they rotated animators during the “heavy” scenes.

10) The Emotional Connection with the Character

In order to make Gruff’s performance realistic, the animators had to connect emotionally with the character. This involved tapping into their own emotions to bring Gruff to life on the screen.

Learning about the animation process was truly an honor. The creation of a character like the NeverBeast is no easy task, especially when coordinating a team of 40 animators. The result, however, is a beautifully animated creature that resonates with audiences worldwide.

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Get “TinkerBell & The Legend of the NeverBeast” on Blu-ray and Disney HD on March 3

Tinkerbell & the Legend of the Neverbeast Facts Description
Characters Tinkerbell, Gruff (the Neverbeast)
Animators Ryan Green (story artist), Mike Greenholt (animation supervisor)
Development of Gruff The animators developed around 70 variations of Gruff before finalizing his design
Inspiration The animators visited the LA Zoo for inspiration, borrowing elements from rhinos, elephants and hippos among others
Gruff’s Design Gruff’s design includes wide, hippo-like legs that can dig, a tail that resembles an opossum’s and can be used as a hand, etc
Animation Process The voice is recorded before animation so that the animators can take reference from the actors
Production Time The movie took 3 1/2 years and 40 animators to complete
Emotional Scenes The animators found the emotional scenes at the end of the movie particularly taxing and would often request to work on something funny afterwards
Release Date The movie was released on Blu-ray and Disney HD on March 3
Sponsored Post This post was sponsored by the company who made the film

Let’s dive deeper into the fascinating world of animation, specifically the creation of the beloved NeverBeast, Gruff, from Disney’s “Tinkerbell & the Legend of the NeverBeast”.

More on the Evolution of Gruff

It’s hard to imagine that Gruff, the lovable NeverBeast, went through about 70 iterations before his final design was settled upon. Every single detail, from the shape of his body to the texture of his fur, was meticulously considered and reconsidered. The animators, including Ryan Green and Mike Greenholt, wanted to make sure that Gruff was not only unique but also credible as a creature in the magical world of Tinkerbell. Each iteration brought them closer to the Gruff we know and love today, a testament to the dedication and creativity of the animation team.

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Delving Deeper into Gruff’s Anatomy

Creating a believable creature like Gruff required a deep understanding of animal anatomy. Ryan Green’s biology degree was put to good use as he and the team dissected the anatomical structures of various animals, including elephants, rhinos, and hippos. This helped them construct Gruff’s skeleton, muscles, and fur in a way that would make him move and behave realistically. The result? A creature that, despite being a product of fantasy, felt incredibly real and relatable to the audience.

Behind the Realistic Movement of Gruff

Making Gruff move like a real creature was no easy task. The animation team didn’t just rely on their imaginations; they actually got down on all fours to understand and mimic the movements of four-legged animals. This hands-on approach ensured that Gruff’s movements were fluid and natural, adding another layer of realism to his character.

How Facial Movements and Mannerisms were Studied

Adding facial expressions and mannerisms to Gruff’s character was another complex task. Mike Greenholt’s dog served as a perfect model, helping the team understand and incorporate realistic facial movements and mannerisms into Gruff’s character. This not only made Gruff more believable but also helped him convey a range of emotions, making him a more engaging and empathetic character.

The Crucial Role of Voice Acting in Animation

Having the voice acting recorded before the animation process helped the animators bring the characters to life. The voice actors’ performances were used as references to ensure the characters’ movements and expressions matched their voices. This synchronization between voice and animation is what makes the characters feel alive and real.

A Peek into the Lengthy Production Process

The creation of “Tinkerbell & the Legend of the NeverBeast” was a labor of love that took 3 1/2 years and a team of 40 animators. The overlapping stages of the production process, from design to story development to animation, required careful coordination and collaboration. Despite the long process, the team’s passion and dedication resulted in a beautifully crafted movie that has touched the hearts of audiences worldwide.

Animation’s Emotional Toll and How It’s Managed

Animating emotional scenes can take a toll on animators. To manage this, the animation team rotated animators during the emotionally heavy scenes. This allowed them to maintain their emotional balance while ensuring the scenes were animated with the emotional depth they required.

The Emotional Connection with Gruff

Creating a character as emotionally resonant as Gruff required the animators to connect deeply with him. They had to tap into their own emotions to bring Gruff’s emotions to life on the screen. This emotional connection is what makes Gruff’s character so compelling and relatable.

Creating a character like Gruff is a testament to the power of animation and the creativity of the animators. It’s a process that requires not only technical skills but also a deep understanding of emotions and animal behavior. The result is a character that is as real and relatable as any human character, proving once again the magic of animation.

Now that you understand the ins and outs of the creation of the NeverBeast, we hope you’ll appreciate Gruff even more the next time you see him on screen!

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Follow TinkerBell on:

Facebook

Twitter

Website

Get “TinkerBell & The Legend of the NeverBeast” on Blu-ray and Disney HD on March 3

FAQs About The Creation of the NeverBeast

What inspired the design of the NeverBeast?

The design was inspired by various animals such as rhinos, elephants, and hippos. The team visited the LA Zoo to study these animals and incorporated their features into the design of the NeverBeast.

How long did it take to create the NeverBeast?

The movie took 3 1/2 years and a team of 40 animators to complete. The production process involved overlapping stages, with the design phase bleeding into the story process, and the story process bleeding into animation.

How did the animators make the NeverBeast move realistically?

The animators got down on all fours to understand how the movement should look. They also studied the facial movements and mannerisms of a dog to add realism to the NeverBeast’s depiction.

How many variations of the NeverBeast were there before the final design?

There were about 70 variations of the NeverBeast before the animators were satisfied with the final design.

Why was the NeverBeast named ‘Gruff’?

The name ‘Gruff’ was a temporary name given by the director during the early stages of development. However, it stuck and eventually became the character’s official name.

How did the animators create a believable creature?

Ryan Green, the story artist, used his degree in biology to help create a believable creature. The team started from the inside out, building the NeverBeast’s skeleton, muscles, and fur.

How did the animators cope with the emotional scenes in the movie?

Since the end of the movie is highly emotional, the animators working on these scenes often found themselves emotionally taxed. To alleviate this, they rotated animators during the “heavy” scenes.

How did the voice acting influence the animation process?

The voice acting for the characters is recorded before the animation process. This allows the animators to reference the actors’ performances during the animation process, ensuring the characters’ movements match their voices.

How did the animators connect emotionally with the NeverBeast?

In order to make the NeverBeast’s performance realistic, the animators had to connect emotionally with the character. This involved tapping into their own emotions to bring the NeverBeast to life on the screen.

FAQ Answer
What inspired the design of the NeverBeast? The design was inspired by various animals such as rhinos, elephants, and hippos.
How long did it take to create the NeverBeast? The movie took 3 1/2 years and a team of 40 animators to complete.
How did the animators make the NeverBeast move realistically? The animators got down on all fours to understand how the movement should look.
How many variations of the NeverBeast were there before the final design? There were about 70 variations of the NeverBeast.
Why was the NeverBeast named ‘Gruff’? The name ‘Gruff’ was a temporary name given by the director during the early stages of development.

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