6 National Parks to Visit in Costa Rica



National Parks of Costa Rica: A Guide to Nature’s Paradise

With a staggering twenty-six percent of its stunning, diverse country designated as national parks, wildlife refuges, biological refuges, or under some other form of protected status, it is no surprise that Costa Rica stands as a beacon for conservation efforts. Both public and private organizations tirelessly strive to shield this country of fascinating ecological and biological diversity from potential human exploitation. This makes Costa Rica an outstanding destination for nature enthusiasts and conservationists, with a range of breathtaking National Parks open for visitors.

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Rincon de la Vieja National Park

Imagine embarking on a self-guided trail, skirting sulfurous hot rocks and boiling mud fumaroles, experiencing the raw and awe-inspiring volcanic activity up close. Rincon de la Vieja National Park offers this unique experience, along with dense rainforests and meadows perfect for hiking and exploration. Follow the trail to the La Cangreja Waterfall, and you will discover hot thermal springs and a refreshing swimming hole.

Isla Del Coco National Park

One of the largest uninhabited islands in the world, Isla Del Coco, offers a unique experience for nature lovers. Designated as a protected National Park in 1978, it is located over three hundred miles from the mainland. This remote island is home to many endemic and endangered species, offering a unique opportunity for visitors to see these creatures in their natural habitat.

Corcovado National Park

In the south of Costa Rica, Corcovado National Park provides a sanctuary for many endangered animal species. This wild area gives visitors the chance to see elusive creatures such as jaguars, Baird’s tapirs, white-lipped peccaries, and a plethora of endemic bird species.

Tortuguero National Park

Imagine navigating through a vast labyrinth of natural jungle canals, spanning over forty thousand acres of the Caribbean coast and hinterland. At Tortuguero National Park, this dream becomes a reality. With a knowledgeable guide, you can spot a myriad of endangered birds, reptiles, and mammals in this unique habitat.

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Manuel Antonio National Park

Manuel Antonio National Park, situated on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica, is a treasure trove of natural beauty. It boasts rugged rainforests, vibrant coral reefs, and pristine beaches with pure white sand. Famous for its vast diversity of wildlife and tropical plants, you might spot endangered capuchin monkeys, three-toed sloths, and a plethora of bird species. Extensive hiking trails crisscross the park, providing opportunities to explore from the coast up into the mountains. And if you’re looking to stay nearby, consider a Manuel Antonio Villa from villapuntodevista.com.

Palo Verde National Park

Palo Verde National Park, part of the Tempisque Conservation Area, focuses on preserving essential floodplains, limestone ridges, marshes, and seasonal pools from threats posed by the encroachment of civilization. During the dry season, a variety of birds flock to the park and its river basin for water. As the largest nesting site for the black-crowned night-herons in the country, Palo Verde plays a critical role in preserving one of the most endangered ecosystems.

Have you ever visited a national park in Costa Rica? We’d love to hear all about your visit! Let us know in the comments.


| National Park | Key Features |
| — | — |
| Rincon de la Vieja National Park | Volcanic activity, rainforests, meadows, La Cangreja Waterfall, hot thermal springs, swimming hole |
| Isla Del Coco | Largest uninhabited islands in the world, many endemic species, designated a protected National Park in 1978 |
| Corcovado National Park | Haven for many endangered species including jaguars, Barid’s tapir, white-lipped peccaries and endemic birds |
| Tortuguero National Park | Large labyrinth of natural jungle canals, home to many endangered birds, reptiles and mammals |
| Manuel Antonio National Park | Rugged rainforest, coral reefs, clean beaches, famous for its diversity of wildlife including capuchin monkeys and three-toed sloths |
| Palo Verde National Park | Part of Tempisque Conservation Area, protects floodplain, limestone ridges, marshes and seasonal pools, largest nesting site for the black-crowned night-herons in the country |

A Deeper Dive into Costa Rica’s National Parks

Costa Rica’s commitment to conservation is truly unparalleled, with an impressive twenty-six percent of the country’s land area designated as protected landscapes. These include national parks, wildlife refuges, biological reserves, and other protected areas. This commitment to preserving its rich biodiversity makes Costa Rica a dream destination for nature lovers, ecotourists, and conservationists alike. Let’s explore more about some of the country’s most popular national parks and what they offer to visitors.

The Volcanic Wonders of Rincon de la Vieja National Park

Rincon de la Vieja National Park is a marvel of nature that offers a unique experience to its visitors. Here, you can walk on self-guided trails, witnessing the awe-inspiring power of volcanic activity firsthand. The park’s landscape is a mix of hot rocks, boiling mud fumaroles, lush rainforests, and open meadows. The La Cangreja Waterfall is a must-visit, where you can relax in hot thermal springs or take a refreshing dip in a natural swimming hole.

The Remote Island Paradise of Isla Del Coco National Park

Isla Del Coco, one of the largest uninhabited islands in the world, is a treasure trove of biodiversity. Since being designated as a National Park in 1978, the island has become a refuge for many endemic and endangered species. This remote island, located over three hundred miles from the mainland, offers a rare opportunity to explore untouched natural habitats.

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The Biodiversity Hotspot of Corcovado National Park

Located in the southern part of Costa Rica, Corcovado National Park is a sanctuary for many endangered animal species. This wild and unspoiled area offers visitors the chance to see elusive creatures such as jaguars, Baird’s tapirs, white-lipped peccaries, and numerous endemic bird species.

The Jungle Canals of Tortuguero National Park

Tortuguero National Park is a unique experience where visitors can navigate through a maze of natural jungle canals. Spanning over forty thousand acres of the Caribbean coast and hinterland, this park is home to a myriad of endangered birds, reptiles, and mammals.

The Coastal Beauty of Manuel Antonio National Park

Manuel Antonio National Park, situated on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica, is a haven of natural beauty. The park is a mix of rugged rainforests, vibrant coral reefs, and pristine white-sand beaches. With its vast diversity of wildlife and tropical plants, visitors can spot endangered capuchin monkeys, three-toed sloths, and numerous bird species. Hiking trails crisscross the park, allowing exploration from the coast up into the mountains.

The Important Ecosystem of Palo Verde National Park

Palo Verde National Park is part of the Tempisque Conservation Area and plays a crucial role in preserving critical floodplains, limestone ridges, marshes, and seasonal pools. During the dry season, a variety of birds flock to the park and its river basin for water. As the largest nesting site for the black-crowned night-herons in the country, Palo Verde plays a vital role in preserving one of the most endangered ecosystems.

Frequently Asked Questions about Costa Rica’s National Parks

1. How many national parks are there in Costa Rica?

Costa Rica is home to 28 national parks, each one unique and offering a different experience for visitors.

2. Can you camp in Costa Rica’s national parks?

Yes, camping is allowed in some of Costa Rica’s national parks, but it’s always best to check with the park’s administration or official website before planning your trip.

3. What is the best time to visit Costa Rica’s national parks?

The best time to visit Costa Rica’s national parks depends on what you want to see and do. Generally, the dry season from December to April is a good time for outdoor activities. However, the wet season from May to November is best for bird watching and seeing lush vegetation.

4. What should I bring when visiting Costa Rica’s national parks?

When visiting Costa Rica’s national parks, it’s advisable to bring a good pair of hiking shoes, rain gear, binoculars for wildlife viewing, sunscreen, insect repellent, and plenty of water.

If you’ve visited a national park in Costa Rica, we’d love to hear about your experience. Please share your stories in the comments below.




National Parks of Costa Rica: A Guide to Nature’s Paradise

With a staggering twenty-six percent of its stunning, diverse country designated as national parks, wildlife refuges, biological refuges, or under some other form of protected status, it is no surprise that Costa Rica stands as a beacon for conservation efforts. Both public and private organizations tirelessly strive to shield this country of fascinating ecological and biological diversity from potential human exploitation. This makes Costa Rica an outstanding destination for nature enthusiasts and conservationists, with a range of breathtaking national parks open for visitors.

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costa-rica-1-7097050

Frequently Asked Questions

Question Answer
How many national parks are there in Costa Rica? Costa Rica has 28 national parks in total.
Can I visit all national parks in Costa Rica? Yes, all national parks in Costa Rica are open for visitors.
What is the largest national park in Costa Rica? The largest national park in Costa Rica is the Corcovado National Park.

Rincon de la Vieja National Park

Imagine embarking on a self-guided trail, skirting sulfurous hot rocks and boiling mud fumaroles, experiencing the raw and awe-inspiring volcanic activity up close. Rincon de la Vieja National Park offers this unique experience, along with dense rainforests and meadows perfect for hiking and exploration. Follow the trail to the La Cangreja Waterfall, and you will discover hot thermal springs and a refreshing swimming hole.

Isla Del Coco National Park

One of the largest uninhabited islands in the world, Isla Del Coco, offers a unique experience for nature lovers. Designated as a protected National Park in 1978, it is located over three hundred miles from the mainland. This remote island is home to many endemic and endangered species, offering a unique opportunity for visitors to see these creatures in their natural habitat.

Corcovado National Park

In the south of Costa Rica, Corcovado National Park provides a sanctuary for many endangered animal species. This wild area gives visitors the chance to see elusive creatures such as jaguars, Baird’s tapirs, white-lipped peccaries, and a plethora of endemic bird species.

Tortuguero National Park

Imagine navigating through a vast labyrinth of natural jungle canals, spanning over forty thousand acres of the Caribbean coast and hinterland. At Tortuguero National Park, this dream becomes a reality. With a knowledgeable guide, you can spot a myriad of endangered birds, reptiles, and mammals in this unique habitat.

Manuel Antonio National Park

Manuel Antonio National Park, situated on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica, is a treasure trove of natural beauty. It boasts rugged rainforests, vibrant coral reefs, and pristine beaches with pure white sand. Famous for its vast diversity of wildlife and tropical plants, you might spot endangered capuchin monkeys, three-toed sloths, and a plethora of bird species. Extensive hiking trails crisscross the park, providing opportunities to explore from the coast up into the mountains. And if you’re looking to stay nearby, consider a Manuel Antonio Villa from villapuntodevista.com.

Palo Verde National Park

Palo Verde National Park, part of the Tempisque Conservation Area, focuses on preserving essential floodplains, limestone ridges, marshes, and seasonal pools from threats posed by the encroachment of civilization. During the dry season, a variety of birds flock to the park and its river basin for water. As the largest nesting site for the black-crowned night-herons in the country, Palo Verde plays a critical role in preserving one of the most endangered ecosystems.

Have you ever visited a national park in Costa Rica? We’d love to hear all about your visit! Let us know in the comments.


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